A Log Cabin Christmas (2011)

 

LogCabin

Experience Christmas through the eyes of adventuresome settlers who relied on log cabins built from trees on their own land to see them through the cruel forces of winter. Discover how rough-hewed shelters become a home in which faith, hope, and love can flourish. Marvel in the blessings of Christmas celebrations without the trappings of modern commercialism where the true meaning of the day shines through. And treasure this collection of nine Christmas romances penned by some of Christian fiction’s best-selling authors.

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Nine Romantic Stories • Nine Authors

“This endearing collection from Barbour [Books, Publisher] follows on from the success of the previous year’s A Prairie Christmas Collection. Compiling short stories from popular and established authors in the historical genre as well as several newcomers, A Log Cabin Christmas features nine stories set in log cabins at varying locations and periods of American history. Ranging from typical homes built out of logs to log schools and stores and even a log church, the authors of A Log Cabin Christmas show readers how romance can blossom in every setting. Characters dream of living in log cabins, build homes from scratch and learn to overcome difficulties in this shared setting, across different locations and time periods at Christmastime in historical America.” Rachel Brand, Good Reads  4 stars.

Stories by: Jane Kirkpatrick • Margaret Brownley • Wanda E. Brunstetter• Kelly Eileen Hake• Liz Johnson• Liz Tolsma• Michelle Ule• Debra Ullrick• Erica Vetsch

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The Courting Quilt

Set in the Willamette Valley of Oregon in 1867, The Courting Quilt is Jane Kirkpatrick’s contribution to A Cabin Christmas short story collection.  Main character, Mary Bishop is a widow, who runs the local mercantile store in a log cabin. When a salesman comes to sell his thread, Mary believes that he is an answer to all her prayers.  However, Mary is only one of a number of eligible potential brides in the community for the charming salesman. Who will meet the test as the best quilter?  Will anyone?

Praise for A Log Cabin Christmas

The authors do a good job of showing the complex relationships between men and women.  There are misunderstandings, fearing to accept or declare love, trying to deal with the children in the family, and then living in a one or two bedroom log cabin is enough to get on anyone nerves.  There are different nationalities, odd family units, dangers from animals and Indians, and more.  The authors are very factual about living back in the 1800’s.  It wasn’t easy, but a well-built cabin and someone to love makes it a lot better.
This book would make a nice Christmas gift.  It’s a book that would be fun to read each Christmas season, just pack it away with your Christmas ornaments.  The stories are short enough they would work for reading aloud, too.  I really enjoyed reading it
.  --Marianne Arkins,  Long and Short Reviews

Although they are all set in the pioneer days, each of these stories is truly timeless.  Love, faith and redemption are consistent themes throughout the collection, with each set of characters struggling to find their way through physical and emotional trials.  Faith and trust in God is the overriding theme, connecting the stories in the collection as strongly as the holiday setting itself.  A wonderful introduction to the work of nine talented authors, A Log Cabin Christmas is a collection you will return to time after time.   -- Joyce Greenfield, Eye on Romance

 

 

Writer's Recollections

The collection began with each author writing about a log cabin and love. Contributors came from all over the country. My log cabin was a store in Brownsville, Oregon but there were school cabins and churches and the comfort of homey log cabins. Seems everyone has a log cabin image nestled in their hearts.

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NYTimesOn the October 2, 2011, New York Times Bestseller list, A Log Cabin Christmas was ranked #34.

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