• Classically trained pianist and singer Natalie Curtis isolated herself for five years after a breakdown just before she was to debut with the New York Philharmonic. Guilt-ridden and songless, Natalie can't seem to recapture the joy music once brought her. In 1902, her brother invites her to join him in the West to search for healing. What she finds are songs she'd never before encountered—the haunting melodies, rhythms, and stories of Native Americans. But their music is under attack. The US government's Code of Offenses prohibits American's indigenous people from singing, dancing, or speaking their own languages as the powers that be insist on assimilation. Natalie makes it her mission not only to document these songs before they disappear but to appeal to President Teddy Roosevelt himself, who is the only man with the power to repeal the unjust law. Will she succeed and step into a new song . . . and a new future? Award-winning author Jane Kirkpatrick weaves yet another lyrical tale based on a true story that will keep readers captivated to the very end. Reviews: "Another enthralling work of historical fiction inspired by real events. Kirkpatrick's portrayal of Natalie's fight for equality and cultural preservation will resonate with readers." —Publishers Weekly Endorsements: "You will find yourself drawn in by the story of Natalie Curtis, an early twentieth-century musical prodigy nearly broken by the rigid conventions of her era, who leaves her loving but somewhat smothering New York family to travel with her brother through the wild expanses of the American Southwest. Curtis finds her health, her voice, and her calling in recording the music of the Southwest’s Native cultures, and determinedly fighting for their rights. Fair warning: once you begin this compelling tale, you won’t be able to put it down." -  Susan J. Tweit, author of Bless the Birds: Living with Love in a Time of Dying "Jane Kirkpatrick presents us with talented musician Natalie Curtis, a woman broken by the very thing she loved, in search of hope and healing yet extending both to those Native singers her path inevitably crosses. Natalie grows across these pages to be a heroine worth rooting for—all the more because this story is true.” - Lori Benton, award-winning author of Burning Sky, Mountain Laurel, and Shiloh Interested in discovering more about Jane’s writing process for this book? Click here to watch the video! Price includes shipping and handling.
  • In 1853, Abigail Scott was a 19-year-old school teacher in Oregon Territory when she married Ben Duniway. Marriage meant giving up on teaching, but Abigail always believed she was meant to be more than a good wife and mother. When Abigail becomes the primary breadwinner for her growing family, what she sees as a working woman appalls her - and prompts her to devote her life to fighting for the rights of women, including the right to vote. Based on a true story, Something Worth Doing will resonate strongly with modern women who still grapple with the pull between career and family, finding their place in the public sphere, and dealing with frustrations and prejudices when competing in male-dominated spaces.  Awards: 
    • Finalist, 2021, Will Rogers Medallion Award - Maverick (new category in 2021)
    • Bestseller List, 2020, Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association (PNBA)
    • Bestseller List, 2020, Library Journal, Christian Fiction
    Reviews:  “Kirkpatrick offers a powerful fictionalized version of the remarkable life of Abigail Scott Duniway, a fierce advocate for women’s rights.”—Booklist ** Starred Review** (See the review here) "A phenomenal read. The emotional journey immediately swept me up into the book."—Urban Lit Magazine "Kirkpatrick has a wonderful voice in historical fiction. The stories that she creates are out of this world! This book definitely deserves more than 5 stars!"—Interviews & Reviews "This is a moving account of a formidable woman... I found it both fascinating and inspiring and a joy to read."—Historical Novel Society Listen to the book trailer. Price includes shipping and handling.
  • "If you’re looking to learn some history you may not have been taught in school, Eminent Oregonians: Three Who Matter should be your next read. By authors Jane Kirkpatrick, Steve Forrester and R. Gregory Nokes, this quick read recounts the lives of three trailblazing Oregonians that paved the way for future generations: Abigail Scott Duniway, Richard Neuberger and Jesse Applegate. As with any biography on influential people throughout history, this book provides merely a snapshot into the lives of these individuals within the context of their time. As Forrester, a co-author, tells Eugene Weekly, “Oregon has become such a myth, but these are reality tales.” A consistent theme for me while reading through this book was, as Forrester put it, a string of “‘I didn’t know that’ moments.” For all the history classes I had taken, including a few at the University of Oregon, I’d not heard of anyone like Duniway, who was one of the first women to ever form her own newspaper. So for any history buffs out there looking to expand your knowledge of historical Oregonians, be sure to pick up this volume and give it a read." —  Sienna Riley, the Eugene Weekly "An inspiring and moving account of three people who helped create modern Oregon. One was a pioneer who fought attempts to make Oregon a slave state. Another was a legendary female journalist and advocate for women's rights. A third was a senator who overcame anti-Semitism and helped nurture modern environmentalism. Oregon has a complicated history, sometimes a painful one, and this is history that is sometimes painful as well as inspiring. But it's always riveting!"-Nicholas Kristof, Author, Pulitzer Prize winner, Human Rights advocate Read the Nov. 3, 2021 Wilmette Week review here! NOTE: This book is not available for sale on this website (JKBooks.com) Discover more and order here. View Jane's interview conducted by moderator Kerry Tymchuk for the Oregon Historical Society. Her co-authors Steven Forrester and R. Gregory Nokes participated in a lively discussion of the book. Interview was conducted on October 5, 2021.
  • Adversity can squelch the human spirit . . . or it can help us discover strength we never knew we had. In 1844, two years before the Donner Party, the Stephens-Murphy-Townsend company leaves Missouri to be the first wagons into California through the Sierra Nevada. They enjoy a safe journey--until October, when a fierce mountain snowstorm forces difficult decisions. The party separates in three directions. Some go overland around Lake Tahoe. Others stay to guard the heaviest wagons. The rest of the party, including eight women and seventeen children, huddle in a makeshift cabin at the headwaters of the Yuba River awaiting rescue. The months ahead will be long and at times terrifying. But with friendship, family, and enough courage to overcome their fear, these intrepid pioneers will discover what truly matters in times of trial. Award-winning author Jane Kirkpatrick plunges you deep into a landscape of challenge where fear and courage go hand in hand for a story of friendship, family, and hope that will remind you of what truly matters in times of trial. Awards:
    • Winner, 2021, Will Rogers Silver Medallion Award, Inspirational Western Fiction (Read more about this award here.)
    • Bestseller List, 2019, Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association (PNBA)
    • Bestseller List, 2020, Christian Booksellers Association (CBA)
    • Finalist, 2020, Will Rogers Medallion Award, Inspirational Western Fiction
    Reviews:  “Kirkpatrick is a commanding innovator of the historical genre with her depth of research and lifelike characters.”—Booklist **Starred Review** "Jane Kirkpatrick has turned a scrap of history into a story of courageous women strong enough to meet the challenges of nature--and of men." —Sandra Dallas, New York Times bestselling author "What an incredible journey this novel is! It's moving and beautifully told, and I absolutely loved it." Molly Gloss, award-winning author of The Jump-Off Creek and The Hearts of Horses Listen to the book trailer. Price includes shipping and handling.
  • In 1911, Carrie Strahorn wrote a memoir sharing some of the most exciting events of 25 years of shaping the American West with her husband, railroad promoter and writer Robert Strahorn. Nearly ten years later, she’s finally ready to reveal the secrets she hadn’t told anyone – even herself. Certain that writings will be found only after her death, Carrie confronts the pain and disappointment of the pioneering life with startling honesty. She explores the danger a women faces of losing herself within a relationship with a strong-willed man. She reaches for the courage to accept her own worth. Most of all she wonders, Can she ever feel truly at home in this rootless life? New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick draws out the emotions of living--the laughter and pain, the love and loss--to give readers a window not only into the past, but into their own conflicted hearts. Based on a true story. Reviews:  “Kirkpatrick seamlessly blends fact and fiction such that readers cannot tell where historical accounts end and the brilliance of her imagination begins. Kirkpatrick illuminates the subtext of Strahorn’s work with incredible spirit, depth, and creativity, illustrating the compelling ways in which people of the past filtered their lives and experiences.” — Booklist **Starred Review** “In Everything She Didn’t Say, bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick expertly captures the indomitable spirit of a woman who is just as comfortable reveling in her pioneering adventures as she is maintaining the composure of a Victorian lady.” —BookPage “In this enjoyable historical novel set on the 19th-century American frontier, Kirkpatrick fleshes out the story of real-life pioneer Carrie Strahorn.”—Publishers Weekly Price includes shipping and handling.
  • Already well-versed in the natural healing properties of herbs and oils, Jennie Pickett longs to become a doctor. But the Oregon frontier of the 1870s is an unforgiving place--especially for a single mother. To support herself and her young son, Jennie finds work caring for an older woman. When her patient dies, Jennie discovers that her heart has become entangled with the woman's widowed husband, a man many years her senior. Their unlikely romance may lead her to her ultimate goal--but the road forward is uncertain. New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick invites you to leave behind your preconceived notions about love and life as you, along with Jennie, discover that dreams may be deferred--but they never really die. Based on a true story Awards: 
    • Finalist, 2017, WILLA Literary Award, Original Softcover Fiction, Women Writing the West
    Reviews:  “Kirkpatrick is wonderful with historical detail and recreating the life of this inspiring woman and other female doctors of that period.”—Publishers Weekly **Starred Review**  “Strong characters, exceptional settings, and a tender romance make this a story most readers will appreciate.”—Library Journal “The stories found in these pages are heartbreaking, poignant, and uplifting. Readers who enjoy romance and character building will find this to be pleasing…”—Compass Book Ratings Listen to the book trailer: Price includes shipping and handling.
  • Drama, Adventure, and Family Struggles Abound as Three Generations Head West on the Oregon Trail Tabitha Brown refuses to be left behind in Missouri when her son makes the decision to strike out for Oregon – even if she has to hire her own wagon to join the party. After all, family ties are stronger than fear. Along with her reluctant daughter and her ever-hopeful granddaughter, the intrepid Tabitha has her misgivings. The trials they face along the way will severely test her faith, courage, and ability to hope. With her family's survival on the line, she must make the ultimate sacrifice, plunging deeper into the wilderness to seek aid. What she couldn't know was how this frightening journey would impact how she understood her own life--and the greater part she had to play in history. With her signature attention to detail and epic style, New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick invites readers to travel the deadly and enticing Oregon Trail. Based on actual events, This Road We Traveled will inspire the pioneer in all of us. Awards:
    • Bestseller List, 2016, Christian Booksellers Association (CBA)
    • Finalist, 2017, Will Rogers Medallion Award, Inspirational Fiction
    • Finalist, 2017, WILLA Literary Award, Original Softcover Fiction, Women Writing the West 
    • Nominee, 2017, Book Award, Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association (PNBA)
    Reviews:  "Kirkpatrick's vivid, rich prose will keep readers in awe and on the edges of their seats." —Publishers Weekly, **Starred Review** "Kirkpatrick's novel embodies a true pioneering spirit."—Booklist **Starred Review** "An unforgettable story of hardship, survival, and the bonds of family, based on true events. Tabby's indomitable spirit proves that women, as well as men, helped to tame the West." —Suzanne Woods Fisher, bestselling author of Anna's Crossing Listen to the book trailer: Price includes shipping and handling.
  • Eliza Spalding Warren was just a child when she was taken hostage by the Cayuse Indians during a massacre in 1847. Now a mother of two, Eliza faces a new kind of dislocation; her impulsive husband wants to make a new start in another territory, which will mean leaving her beloved home and her mother's grave--and returning to the land of her captivity. Haunted by memories and hounded by struggle, Eliza longs to know how her mother dealt with the trauma of their ordeal. As she searches the pages of her mother's diary, Eliza is stunned to find that her own recollections tell only part of the story. Based on true events, The Memory Weaver is New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick's literary journey which will take readers into the past, where threads of western landscapes, family, and faith weave a tapestry of hope inside every pioneering woman's heart. Get swept up in this emotional story of the memories that entangle us and the healing that awaits us when we bravely unravel the threads of the past. Awards:
    • Bestseller List, 2015, Christian Booksellers Association (CBA)
    • Winner, 2016, Will Rogers Gold Medallion Award, Inspirational Fiction
    • Finalist, 2016, Spur Award, Best Western Historical Fiction, Western Writers of America
    Reviews:  "Kirkpatrick exercises her considerable gift for making history come alive."—Publishers Weekly "This heart-stirring new historical novel has romance, mystery, and adventure." — RT Book Reviews Listen to the book trailer. Price includes shipping and handling.
  • Three very different women. One dangerous journey. And a future that seems just out of reach. Letitia holds nothing more dear than the papers that prove she is no longer a slave. They may not cause most white folks to treat her like a human being, but at least they show she is free. She trusts in those words she cannot read--as she is beginning to trust in Davey Carson, an Irish immigrant cattleman who wants her to come west with him. Nancy Hawkins is loathe to leave her settled life for the treacherous journey by wagon train, but she is so deeply in love with her husband and she knows she will follow him anywhere--even when the trek exacts a terrible cost. Betsy is a Kalapuya Indian, the last remnant of a once proud tribe in the Willamette Valley in Oregon territory. She spends her time trying to impart the wisdom and ways of her people to her grandson. But she will soon have another person to care for. As season turns to season, suspicion turns to friendship, and fear turns to courage, three spirited women will discover what it means to be truly free in a land that makes promises it cannot fulfill. This multilayered story from bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick will grip your heart and mind as you travel on the dusty and dangerous Oregon Trail into the boundless American West. Based on a true story. Awards:
    • Bestseller List, 2012, Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association (PNBA)
    • Bestseller List, 2014,  Christian Booksellers Association (CBA)
    • Winner, 2015, WILLA Literary Award, Original Softcover Fiction, Women Writing the West 
    • Finalist, 2015, Spur Award, Best Western Historical Novel, Western Writers of America
    Reviews: Kirkpatrick exercises her considerable gift for making history come alive in this real-life tale of a freed slave who travels across the country to Oregon Territory in the late 1840s. Kirkpatrick draws an indelible and intriguing portrait of Letitia Carson, an African-American woman who obtains her freedom and then determinedly makes her own way in a unsympathetic society. Kirkpatrick’s historical homework is thorough, and her realization of a little-known African-American pioneer is persuasive and poignant. Publisher's Weekly Listen to the book trailer. Price includes shipping and handling.
  • Born to an unavailable mother and an abusive father, Dorothea Dix longs simply to protect and care for her younger brothers, Charles and Joseph. But at just fourteen, she is separated from them and sent to live with relatives to be raised properly. Lonely and uncertain, Dorothea discovers that she does not possess the ability to accept the social expectations imposed on her gender and she desires to accomplish something more than finding a suitable mate. Yearning to fulfill her God-given purpose, Dorothea finds she has a gift for teaching and writing. Her pupils become a kind of family, hearts to nurture, but long bouts of illness end her teaching and Dorothea is adrift again. It’s an unexpected visit to a prison housing the mentally ill that ignites an unending fire in Dorothea’s heart—and sets her on a journey that will take her across the nation, into the halls of the Capitol, befriending presidents and lawmakers, always fighting to relieve the suffering of what Scripture deems, the least of these. In bringing nineteenth-century, historical reformer Dorothea Dix to life, author Jane Kirkpatrick combines historical accuracy with the gripping narrative of a woman who recognized suffering when others turned away, and the call she heeded to change the world. Reviews:  “Jane Kirkpatrick has the rare ability to use what’s known about historical women as the foundation for compelling historical fiction. Here, Kirkpatrick shines her light on the remarkable life of Dorothea Dix, seamlessly blending fact and fiction to illuminate Dix’s journey from a girl struggling to save her family to a woman championing all those in need. Dorothea Dix can still inform and inspire modern readers, and One Glorious Ambition is a story to be treasured.” —Kathleen Ernst, award-winning author of the Chloe Ellefson Mysteries “Read this book and have Dorothea Dix transform your life. Be uplifted not simply by the grand trajectory of Dix’s singular journey but by the irresistible voice that Jane Kirkpatrick compels you to hear. A deeply sensitive and intelligent young woman overcomes trenchant pain and social barriers to fight tirelessly for those who have neither a voice nor an advocate. Her impossible life is unraveled and liberated in this novel. And read with a sense of urgency, for the battles fought by Dorothea Dix more than a century ago are very much in need of being waged again.” Charles Kiselyak, producer and director of award-winning films including Completely Cuckoo, Fearful Symmetry, and A Constant Forge “A must-read! I was moved to tears by the sense of history, tragedy, and hope of Dorothea’s life work accomplished on behalf of people with mental health challenges. Every human being should know Dorothea Dix’s story. Jane Kirkpatrick captures it magnificently!” Gina Firman Nikkel, PhD, president and CEO, Foundation for Excellence in Mental Health Care Price includes shipping and handling.
  • One woman, an impossible dream, and the faith it took to see it through, inspired by the life of Hulda Klager German immigrant and farm wife Hulda Klager possesses only an eighth-grade education—and a burning desire to create something beautiful. What begins as a hobby to create an easy-peeling apple for her pies becomes Hulda’s driving purpose: a time-consuming interest in plant hybridization that puts her at odds with family and community, as she challenges the early twentieth-century expectations for a simple housewife.   Through the years, seasonal floods continually threaten to erase her Woodland, Washington garden and a series of family tragedies cause even Hulda to question her focus. In a time of practicality, can one person’s simple gifts of beauty make a difference?   Based on the life of Hulda Klager, Where Lilacs Still Bloom is a story of triumph over an impossible dream and the power of a generous heart. Awards:
    • Bestseller List, 2012, Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association (PNBA)
    • Winner, 2013, Carol Award, American Christian Fiction Writers (AFCW)
    Reviews: I have enjoyed Jane Kirkpatrick's gift of "enhanced biography"--her true stories of women of the northwest enhanced by her gift of fiction and storytelling. This lovely book is no exception. I am not a gardener but this story made me wish I was! I now understand why people pour themselves into creating beauty from dirt. And I will never look at lilacs the same way again. Hulda Klager's gift was truly remarkable...and inspiring! - Wynn, Amazon Reviewer This book will inspire your dreams and refresh your soul. Hulda's simple life belies her incredible gifts as a gardener. Her thoughts and words reached deep into my heart and soul. Her German heritage mirrors my mother's, as does her indomitable spirit and deep abiding Faith. Thank you Jane Kirkpatrick for sharing the realities of Hulda's amazing story by making it personal in its fictionalization. - Janet, Amazon Reviewer Price includes shipping and handling.
  • A mother's tragedy, a daughter's desire and the 7000 mile journey that changed their lives.    In 1896 Norwegian American Helga Estby accepted a wager from the fashion industry to walk from Spokane, Washington to New York City within seven months in an effort to earn $10,000. Bringing along her nineteen year-old daughter Clara, the two made their way on the 3500-mile trek by following the railroad tracks and motivated by the money they needed to save the family farm.  After returning home to the Estby farm more than a year later, Clara chose to walk on alone by leaving the family and changing her name. Her decisions initiated a more than 20-year separation from the only life she had known.   Historical fiction writer Jane Kirkpatrick picks up where the fact of the Estbys’ walk leaves off to explore Clara's continued journey. What motivated Clara to take such a risk in an era when many women struggled with the issues of rights and independence? And what personal revelations brought Clara to the end of her lonely road?  The Daughter's Walk weaves personal history and fiction together to invite readers to consider their own journeys and family separations, to help determine what exile and forgiveness are truly about. Awards:
    • Bestseller List, 2011, Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association (PNBA)
    Reviews:  “Kirkpatrick has done impeccable homework, and what she recreates and what she imagines are wonderfully seamless. Readers see the times, the motives, the relationships that produce a chain of decisions and actions, all rendered with understatement. Kirkpatrick is a master at using fiction to illuminate history’s truths. This beautiful and compelling work of historical fiction deserves the widest possible audience.”Publishers Weekly**Starred Review** "Jane Kirkpatrick brings immense integrity to historical imagination, using her consummate skills as a historian sleuth and psychologist. A compelling portrait of Clara's own bold entrepreneurial spirit gives readers believable insight on how a mother and daughter's love survives financial hardship a courageous thirty-five-hundred-mile walk, family tragedy, and estrangement. Bravo!." Linda L. Hunt, award-winning author of Bold Spirit: Helga Estby's Forgotten Walk Across Victorian America "Jane Kirkpatrick's attention to detail and ability to craft living, breathing characters immerses the reader into her story world. I come away entranced, enlightened, and enriched after losing myself in one of her novels." Kim Vogel Sawyer, best-selling author of My Heart Remembers Watch the book trailer here. Price includes shipping and handling.
  • Out of the wilderness… Three women. Three eras. Three miracles.  1901: Plagued by loneliness on the Big Muddy Ranch, a sheepherder’s wife awaits the outcome of her husband’s trial for murder. He is sentenced to life in prison—and she to life without him. But a startling event could redeem their pasts and transform their future. 1984: Against a backdrop of attempted murder, federal indictments, and the first case of bioterrorism in the U.S., one woman seeks to rescue her granddaughter from within the elaborate compound of a cult that has claimed the land. 1997: On the much-reviled, abandoned cult site, one woman’s skepticism turns to hope when she finds that what was meant to destroy can be used to rebuild—and in the process realizes a long-held dream.  For three women seekers united across time, a remote and rugged stretch of land in the Pacific Northwest proves to be a place where miracles really happen—and the gifts of faith, hope, and charity are as tangible as rocks, rivers, and earth. Based on true stories. Awards:
    • Bestseller List, 2005, Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association (PNBA)
    • Finalist, 2005, Spur Award, Western Writers of America
    Reviews:  "If you can't read the first two pages of A Land of Sheltered Promise and not want to read the rest of it, it must be that you simply don't care for novels that speak directly to your soul...Classic Kirkpatrick: That is, it is tightly written, honestly conceived and executed, deeply moving, and exciting...Kirkpatrick uses language that is like liquid in its ability to change directions and reveal or change landscapes and secrets. In her case, language is key to her ability to touch so many people so deeply...In one sense it is calculated to make you feel, but it is also calculated to make you think, to examine the concept of choices, of options." —Dan Hays, reviewer Salem Statesman Journal A Land of Sheltered Promise is historical Christian fiction at its best. The reader comes away with a clear vision of the land, of the people who occupied the land, and of a Supreme Being who ties it all together.”—The Historical Novels Review Price includes shipping and handling.

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